For Teens

Do you have big plans for your future?  Would you like an easy guide to help simplify the college admission process and help you get noticed at your dream school?  

Read more

FREE College Planning Workshop - Wallingford, CT

Ten Secrets Teens (and Parents) Should Know Before Applying for College

Wallingford Public Library, Wallingford, CT  (See Website for Directions)

Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013

6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

Please join us for a free college planning workshop and book signing!  Books are marked down to $15.00 when purchased in person.

Did you know only 36% of today's college students graduate from college within four years?  Did you know the cost of college is growing at three times the rate of inflation?  In this two hour class, Annette Bosley-Boyce, author of The College Success Plan, will explain unknown facts, tips, and strategies to help teens (and their parents) develop a realistic and beneficial plan for college--one that inspires them to set goals for themselves on career planning and college financing.  Teens will learn that it is not about feeling honored that college have accepted them; it is about colleges feeling honored that they were selected.  Recommended for sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Event-Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2013 - 06:30

FREE College Planning Workshop - Woodbury, CT

Ten Secrets Teens (and Parents) Should Know Before Applying for College

Woodbury Public Library, Woodbury, CT  (See Website for Directions)

Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013

7:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m.

Please join us for a free college planning workshop and book signing!  Books are marked down to $15.00 when purchased in person.

"Did you know only 36% of today's college students graduate from college within four years?  Did you know the cost of college is growing at three times the rate of inflation?  In this two hour class, Annette Bosley-Boyce, author of The College Success Plan, will explain unknown facts, tips, and strategies to help teens (and their parents) develop a realistic and beneficial plan for college--one that inspires them to set goals for themselves on career planning and college financing.  Teens will learn that it is not about feeling honored that college have accepted them; it is about colleges feeling honored that they were selected.  Recommended for sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Event-Date: 
Thursday, September 12, 2013 - 07:00

Free College Application Essay Workshop, Newington, CT

Free College Application Essay Workshop

Lucy Robbins Welles Library, Newington, CT (See Website for Directions)

Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Please join us for a college application essay class and book signing! Books are marked down to $15.00 when purchased in person.

Learn how to get into your “reach school” with a dynamite college admission essay! Write an essay that will grab an admission counselor's attention. This one-session class will give you resources, handouts and student writing samples for your perusal. Students and parents are welcome to attend this valuable class.

Event-Date: 
Thursday, August 1, 2013 - 06:30

Creating a College Budget

College Money JarIf you're like many college students, these few years away from home may be the first real opportunity you've ever had to take charge of your own life as well as your own financial affairs.

But while you may have been a whiz at high school chemistry, or your team's best fielder, you probably haven't had to watch the dollars and cents as closely as you will have to now. And if you fail to handle your expenses wisely because you’ve never learned to manage your money, college can be a time of worry, growing debt and increasing financial difficulty.

While some of your college costs are fixed – tuition, fees, room and board – others are more variable – books, clothing, entertainment, travel, etc. And though you cannot control the fixed costs, the variable costs can be partially ameliorated with careful planning, prudent spending and the creation of an intelligent budget.

Basically, the math is easy and surely you're familiar with how a spreadsheet works. On one side of the ledger you need to list all sources of income. That includes the money from your parents and other relatives, as well as any revenue from your own savings or employment. Also include whatever financial aid you've managed to obtain and all student loans you've had to take out in order to meet your expenses.

On the other side, you need to list all of your fixed costs plus estimates of all your variable expenses such as toiletries and sundries, books and supplies. Don’t forget any outstanding bills you currently owe, any balances on credit card accounts, travel, entertainment, a little left over for emergencies. If possible, include whatever you think you can contribute while in school to paying off your student loan debt.

Now you're going to have to watch your budget carefully at first, keeping a record of all income and expenditures as the semester progresses, while tinkering with the numbers when necessary and staying on track as much as possible. If one category gets a little out of whack and you find that you're spending more than your estimate, you'll have to find some savings somewhere else.

And that shouldn't be that hard. Being a smart consumer is the best way to keep your budget in check. For example, look for any student discounts offered on campus or by local businesses; take advantage of the "free" college events like movies and concerts you've already paid for with your activity fees; buy used books whenever possible; when calling home, use Skype instead of phone minutes.

Most importantly, set limits for yourself on how much you're going to spend on dates and nights out. Remember: Extreme partying can lower not only your grades, but also your bank account.

Creating your college budget is easy - it's sticking to it that's the hard part. But once you get into the habit of spending within your means and being fiscally responsible, not only will your college years be freer of worry; you'll be creating the kind of good money habits that will suit you well, long after you graduate.

Al Krulick is an award-winning journalist with dozens of years of writing experience. He writes and blogs for Debt.org.

Writing Your First Resume

Teens with resumesI remember my first resume.  I wrote it in college, and I used a very large 16 pt., Times New Roman font to make sure my page seemed covered (with minimal white spaces).  What I didn't   know then is that I used the oldest trick in the book.  Everyone knows that large font equals little content.  Please, don't try this at home! 

Today many high school students are creating their first resume because it makes a great first impression for both employers and college admissions counselors.  By attaching a resume to a job application or to a college application, teens are helping differentiate themselves from others.  As we know, not all sixteen year-olds bring resumes into Super Stop & Shop or Al's Hotdog Stand, but those who do, may see their application suddenly reach the top of the pile.

The biggest question both teens and parents have about resumes is what to put on them.  As we know, most teens don't have much work experience, and so they decide it's too soon to create one, but I say nonsense!  Most teens have many accomplishments that can be placed on a resume, and if done right, they can create a well-formatted resume that grows with them each year as they learn more and gain more experiences.

To begin your first resume, here are the categories you can fill in.  If you're having trouble thinking of anything to place in these categories, please see the examples I provide in italics to help you...

THE HEADER - This is where you place your name, mailing address, phone number, and email address, so an employer (or college admissions counselor) can contact you.  Placing this information at the top center of your resume is key.  It needs to stand out.

OBJECTIVE - This category lets your audience know about your future plans.  This is the one area in your resume that will change depending on your audience.  For example, if you're sending a resume with your college application, you will want to include your long-term goals.  If you're sending a resume to an employer, you will most likely include short-term goals.

To attend college and complete all educational requirements to become a physical therapist. 

Seeking a part-time position while attending college, which will utilize my strong interpersonal skills.

SKILLS SUMMARY - This category lists three to five skills or interests that you have that make you stand out.  Here, the goal is to get your audience's attention by highlighting your abilities, showing a strong work ethic, and capitalizing on your uniqueness.

Bilingual in English and Spanish; Strong work ethic with excellent academic record; Two years customer service experience; Proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint; Good listener; Excellent writing skills 

EDUCATION - This is where you list your degrees and schools attended.  If you're a high school student, you will want to list the high school you're attending.

Masuk High School, Monroe, CT; Candidate, High School Diploma (June 2015) 

ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT - Did you make the honor roll?  Do you have a GPA that's a 3.5 or higher?  Will you be graduating within the top 10% of your class?  Did you take AP or college credit courses?  Were you inducted into a national honor society?

3.7 GPA; Voted "Most Likely to Succeed;" Masuk High School 2013 Science Fair Award Recipient; Senior Class President 

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES - This includes any activities like sports, clubs, band, or extracurricular involvement.

Member, Year Book Committee; Junior Varsity Football Player; Band Member, Saxophone; Drama Club - performed as a main character in Neil Simon's Plaza Suite; Girl Scout Cadette 

EXPERIENCE - This category lists your work experience.  Most people believe this category is only reserved for paid jobs, but the reality is that "experience" can come from volunteer work, internships, apprenticeships, and even job shadowing.  Important skills can be learned from attending a specialized summer camp or from taking care of a loved one at home.

Volunteer, Habitat for Humanity, Bridgeport, CT (2012 - Present)

  • Assisted with various demolition, construction, and cleaning duties to help refurbish an old house for a family in need.
  • Worked as part of a team effort to reach goals and deadlines.
  • Quickly learned new "hands-on" skills.

  

After reading through all these categories, most teens begin to realize they have more accomplishments that can be listed on a resume than they realize.  A high school resume should never exceed one page, and so, with a little bit of thought and effort, they should be able to fill up this page with skills, activities, awards, and experiences that are all genuinely unique to them.  Would you like more information about resume writing and formatting?  This post is the first of a three-part series, so stay tuned...

 

Annette Bosley-Boyce is the author of The College Success Plan and the Director of the Evening Division at Albertus Magnus College in New Haven, CT.  She has over 13 years of combined college teaching and administration experience.  For more quick and easy college planning tips, please see her on Twitter andFacebook.

5 Tips to Help Teens Find Summer Jobs

Working TeenLast year, in 2012, teens had difficulty finding summer jobs, and this year the summer job outlook appears to be the same.  The job market continues to be flooded with the unemployed, the under-employed (those people seeking more than one job to make ends meet), college graduates, college students, and finally...yes...our high school teens.  With much competition, high school teens may need to begin their summer job search now.  (After all, college students start finishing up their coursework as soon as the first week of May at some schools.)

To help them strategize now, here are five tips we can give them to have an edge and maybe even help them find a summer job that will help them grow professionally.

1)  Look Now! High school and college teens should begin searching and filling out job applications now.  They can begin by going to previous employers.  However, if they've never worked before or want to find something different, they should start looking in the paper, online, in windows, and asking around.  Family, friends, and friends of friends may know of job openings in the area.  Also, it doesn't hurt for teens to drive to places and inquire within.  Some managers may ask them to fill out an application on the spot, even when their summer hiring hasn't yet begun.

2) Include a Resume.  Does your teen have a resume?  Most employers these days appreciate having a resume attached to an application; it allows them to learn more about the person.  Many teens don't have resumes because they think they need to have work experience first.  Nothing can be further from the truth.  Besides posting their year in school and GPA (if it's high), teens can also post any volunteer work, internships, school leadership roles, or unpaid jobs like babysitting their younger siblings.  Including a list of extracurricular activities also works well.  Providing this extra information not only shows responsibility and a strong work ethic, but it also helps build rapport.  Who knows?  That very same hiring manager may play the bassoon too!

3)  A little formality goes a long way.  It's not a secret that many employers are skittish about hiring teens.  They've either heard stories or had experiences themselves with teens that were sloppy, lazy, entitled, or irresponsible.  Unfortunately, these teens create an ongoing stereotype for your poor son or daughter that may be none of those things.  When meeting an employer in person, even if it's just to fill out an application, have them dress to impress.  (Khaki pants and a button down shirt might be appropriate for a young man while a blouse with dress pants or a skirt works well for a young woman.)  The goal, obviously, is for them to appear more mature and professional than their peers, which are notorious for wearing ripped, baggy, sloppy, provocative, revealing, or otherwise inappropriate clothing.  Flip flops can be another eyesore.  

4)  Keep a clean online presence.  Employers are quickly moving to the internet to learn more things about their job applicants (even if they don't admit it).  A simple Google search can bring up Facebook, You Tube, LinkedIn, Twitter, and other pages and posts.  It goes without saying that underage drinking, inappropriate photos, swearing, and vulgarity are all seen to be deal breakers.  Beyond the social network scope, teens' emails, follow-up thank you's, and other online communication should also be "clean" as in carefully written and free of text language and glaring grammatical mistakes.

5)  Go where the jobs are!   Places that tend to be busiest during the summer include landscaping businesses, golf courses, travel destinations (such as hotels, amusement parks, beaches, museums, and novelty stores), restaurants, summer camps, and even offices where many full-time employees take long or numerous summer vacations.  If your teen is presented with multiple opportunities, remind him or her to try choosing a summer job that will provide the most experience, particularly in a specific field.  For example, any teen thinking about becoming a chef should try to find work in a restaurant, just like a teen thinking about education would benefit from working in a summer school program.  Opportunities don't always exist to explore particular fields, but when they do, we need to take them!

Finally, if your teen can't find work, isn't interested in working yet, or is simply too young, volunteer, internship, and academic summer camp opportunities can be explored.  These opportunities will be mentioned in the weeks to come!

 

 Annette Bosley-Boyce is the author of The College Success Plan and the Director of the Evening Division at Albertus Magnus College in New Haven, CT.  She has over 13 years of combined college teaching and administration experience.  For more quick and easy college planning tips, please see her on Twitter andFacebook.

Local Author Showcase--Wallingford Public Library, CT

Local Author Showcase

Wallingford Public Library, Wallingford, CT  (See Website for Directions)

Saturday, May 11, 2013

1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Come spend a relaxing afternoon listening to stories of inspiration from various local authors in Connecticut.  

Books from all genres are sold in-person and are often offered at discounted prices.  

Wallingford Public Library Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event-Date: 
Saturday, May 11, 2013 - 01:00

Free College Planning Workshop - Wallingford, CT

Ten Secrets Teens (and Parents) Should Know Before Applying for College

Wallingford Public Library, Wallingford, CT  (See Website for Directions)

Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2013

6:30 p.m. - 7:45 p.m.

Please join us for a free college planning workshop and book signing!  Books are marked down to $15.00 when purchased in person.

"Did you know only 36% of today's college students graduate from college within four years?  Did you know the cost of college is growing at three times the rate of inflation?  In this one-hour session, Annette Bosley-Boyce, author of The College Success Plan, will explain unknown facts, tips, and strategies to help teens (and their parents) develop a realistic and beneficial plan for college--one that inspires them to set goals for themselves on career planning and college financing.  Teens will learn that it is not about feeling honored that colleges have accepted them; it is about colleges feeling honored that they were selected.  Recommended for high school freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors."

Event-Date: 
Tuesday, October 8, 2013 - 06:30

Free College Planning Workshop - Windsor, CT

Ten Secrets Teens (and Parents) Should Know Before Applying for College

Windsor Public Library, Windsor, CT  (See Website for Directions)

Monday, May 20, 2013

7 p.m. - 8:15 p.m.

Please join us for a free college planning workshop and book signing!  Books are marked down to $15.00 when purchased in person.

"Did you know only 36% of today's college students graduate from college within four years?  Did you know the cost of college is growing at three times the rate of inflation?  In this one-hour session, Annette Bosley-Boyce, author of The College Success Plan, will explain unknown facts, tips, and strategies to help teens (and their parents) develop a realistic and beneficial plan for college--one that inspires them to set goals for themselves on career planning and college financing.  Teens will learn that it is not about feeling honored that colleges have accepted them; it is about colleges feeling honored that they were selected.  Recommended for high school freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors."

Event-Date: 
Monday, May 20, 2013 - 07:00

College Planning Workshop - Southbury, CT

Hidden Secrets of College Planning

Sponsored by the Education Connection, Litchfield, CT

Pomperaug High School, Southbury, CT  (See Website for Registration and Directions)

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Fee: $30.00

Please join us for a free college planning workshop and book signing!  Books are marked down to $15.00 when purchased in person.

"Did you know only 36% of today's college students graduate from college within four years?  Did you know the cost of college is growing at three times the rate of inflation?  In this two hour class, Annette Bosley-Boyce, author of The College Success Plan, will explain unknown facts, tips, and strategies to help teens (and their parents) develop a realistic and beneficial plan for college--one that inspires them to set goals for themselves on career planning and college financing.  Teens will learn that it is not about feeling honored that colleges have accepted them; it is about colleges feeling honored that they were selected.  Recommended for sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Event-Date: 
Tuesday, March 26, 2013 - 06:00

Pages